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A GlaxoSmithKline logo is displayed on one of its buildings in west London in this file photo. Struggling European markets have affected the drug maker’s earnings.
A GlaxoSmithKline logo is displayed on one of its buildings in west London in this file photo. Struggling European markets have affected the drug maker’s earnings.
(TOBY MELVILLE/REUTERS)

‘Not-Stupid’ investing strategy applied to health care stocks

The previous instalment of Not-Stupid investing discussed three long-term secular trends that could provide the best growth tailwind for investors – health care, agriculture and cloud computing. Now it’s time to dig deeper in search of individual long-term stock ideas. We’ll start with health care.

The Not-Stupid school of investing is a Berkshire Hathaway-heavy strategy that takes its name from a quote by Charlie Munger, the less publicity-focused half of the Berkshire Hathwaway brain trust.