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In calendar days, the current bull market is now 1,967 days old, which most observers agree is getting pretty old. It ranks as the fourth-longest bull market in modern times, according to data of the S&P 500 from Bespoke Investment Group, and it also ranks fourth in terms of its percentage gain.
In calendar days, the current bull market is now 1,967 days old, which most observers agree is getting pretty old. It ranks as the fourth-longest bull market in modern times, according to data of the S&P 500 from Bespoke Investment Group, and it also ranks fourth in terms of its percentage gain.
(Nick M. Do/iStockphoto)

Why the end of this aging bull market isn't in sight

When stocks fall 20 per cent, a bull market by definition ends. But the tricky part is trying to figure out what will trigger it, and when.

With the S&P 500 up nearly 200 per cent from its low in 2009, investing conditions looking eerily calm and valuations that are no longer cheap, a number of market watchers are starting to ponder this issue.