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FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2014 file photo Head of the European Central Bank, ECB, Mario Draghi attends a news conference in Frankfurt, Germany. Italy is standing out as the European economy’s problem child. Other countries that used to dominate negative headlines _ Spain, Greece, Ireland, Portugal _ are slowly healing from the debt crisis that ravaged the currency union in 2009-2012. That set off a scolding for Italy from Draghi, a former civil servant at the Italian Treasury and Bank of Italy head with deep knowledge of the country’s economy and political scene. (AP Photo/dpa, Boris Roessler)
FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2014 file photo Head of the European Central Bank, ECB, Mario Draghi attends a news conference in Frankfurt, Germany. Italy is standing out as the European economy’s problem child. Other countries that used to dominate negative headlines _ Spain, Greece, Ireland, Portugal _ are slowly healing from the debt crisis that ravaged the currency union in 2009-2012. That set off a scolding for Italy from Draghi, a former civil servant at the Italian Treasury and Bank of Italy head with deep knowledge of the country’s economy and political scene. (AP Photo/dpa, Boris Roessler)
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S&P 500 hits record high for all the wrong reasons

The S&P 500 surpassing the 2000-threshold in intraday trading on Monday is a big deal. Too bad, though, that the achievement was driven by hopes for more central bank stimulus.

The bull market is now five-and-a-half years old, and in this time U.S. stocks have tripled from their bear-market lows in early 2009.