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Prime Minister Stephen Harper looks over at Da Mao, one of two Panda bears as it peers out of a container after arriving by FedEx transport jet in Toronto. The two bears, on loan from China, will spend time at both the Toronto and Calgary Zoos.
Prime Minister Stephen Harper looks over at Da Mao, one of two Panda bears as it peers out of a container after arriving by FedEx transport jet in Toronto. The two bears, on loan from China, will spend time at both the Toronto and Calgary Zoos.
(Moe Doiron/The Globe and Mail)

Harper isn’t anti-science – but he is short-sighted

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Last week, the following resolution, sponsored by New Democrat Kennedy Stewart, was put forward in the House of Commons:

That, in the opinion of the House: (a) public science, basic research and the free and open exchange of scientific information are essential to evidence-based policy-making; (b) federal government scientists must be enabled to discuss openly their findings with their colleagues and the public; and (c) the federal government should maintain support for its basic scientific capacity across Canada, including immediately extending funding, until a new operator is found, to the world-renowned Experimental Lakes Area Research Facility to pursue its unique research program.”