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Marchers pass the White House while protesting against the Keystone XL pipeline: Alberta, trying to sell the pipeline to the U.S. population, is proposing surprisingly high emission standards and harsh penalties. A demonstrator holds up a sign during a march past the White House to protest against the Keystone XL pipeline in Washington, February 17, 2013. The TransCanada Corp pipeline would link the oil sands of northern Alberta, the world's third largest crude resource, to refineries and ports in Texas. Environmentalists say approval of the pipeline will encourage more development in the oil sands, where extraction is carbon intensive, leading to greater greenhouse gas emissions. REUTERS/Richard Clement (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS CIVIL UNREST ENERGY)
Marchers pass the White House while protesting against the Keystone XL pipeline: Alberta, trying to sell the pipeline to the U.S. population, is proposing surprisingly high emission standards and harsh penalties. A demonstrator holds up a sign during a march past the White House to protest against the Keystone XL pipeline in Washington, February 17, 2013. The TransCanada Corp pipeline would link the oil sands of northern Alberta, the world's third largest crude resource, to refineries and ports in Texas. Environmentalists say approval of the pipeline will encourage more development in the oil sands, where extraction is carbon intensive, leading to greater greenhouse gas emissions. REUTERS/Richard Clement (UNITED STATES - Tags: ENVIRONMENT POLITICS CIVIL UNREST ENERGY)
(RICHARD CLEMENT/REUTERS)

Keystone debate could fuel broader movement to slow greenhouse emissions worldwide

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Consider Keystone XL in reverse. Not as a cost-effective way to funnel upwards of one million barrels of Canada oil sands crude daily to the massive refinery complexes in Texas, but as a daily northbound cash flow of roughly $100-million that would fund – in fact would likely spur – a tripling of production from the vast, mostly-untapped Alberta bitumen reserves.