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EDMONTON ALBERTA, APRIL 30, 2012. Temporary foreign worker David Beattie,left, from Scotland and Thomas Sutton from England take a break from working on the construction of a new police station in Edmonton, Monday April 30, 2012. In Alberta's stretched labour market, some employers have had to turn to overseas labour. (Jason Franson for The Globe and Mail.
EDMONTON ALBERTA, APRIL 30, 2012. Temporary foreign worker David Beattie,left, from Scotland and Thomas Sutton from England take a break from working on the construction of a new police station in Edmonton, Monday April 30, 2012. In Alberta's stretched labour market, some employers have had to turn to overseas labour. (Jason Franson for The Globe and Mail.
(Jason Franson For The Globe and Mail)

More and more temporary foreign workers are settling in Canada

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The ballooning use of temporary foreign workers in Canada suggests a growing rootless class of employees, but a deeper examination of the data shows increasing numbers of these visitors are ultimately finding a permanent home in this country.