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A member of the Free Syrian Army holds his weapon as he sits on a sofa in the middle of a street in Deir al-Zor, in this April 2, 2013, file photo. The United States believes with varying degrees of confidence that Syria’s regime has used chemical weapons on a small scale, the White House said last Thursday.
A member of the Free Syrian Army holds his weapon as he sits on a sofa in the middle of a street in Deir al-Zor, in this April 2, 2013, file photo. The United States believes with varying degrees of confidence that Syria’s regime has used chemical weapons on a small scale, the White House said last Thursday.
(STRINGER/REUTERS)

Meet the Syrian opposition’s pitch man in Ottawa

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Here’s Molham Aldrobi’s difficult task: to convince the Canadian government that the Muslim Brotherhood are moderates in Syria, that extremists don’t dominate the opposition, and that Ottawa should open its purse-strings wider for medical and other aid to rebel-held areas.