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Syncrude Canada Ltd.'s oil sands processing facility stands in Fort McMurray, Alberta, pictured Tuesday, June 29, 2010. Canada's oil sands, a mixture of sand, clay, water and a heavy oil called bitumen, contain the world's second largest proven concentration of crude oil reserves at about 170 billion barrels. In a report released Oct. 4, 2012, Syncrude was proven not responsible for the deaths of 1,600 ducks after they landed in toxic ponds due to harsh weather conditions.
Syncrude Canada Ltd.'s oil sands processing facility stands in Fort McMurray, Alberta, pictured Tuesday, June 29, 2010. Canada's oil sands, a mixture of sand, clay, water and a heavy oil called bitumen, contain the world's second largest proven concentration of crude oil reserves at about 170 billion barrels. In a report released Oct. 4, 2012, Syncrude was proven not responsible for the deaths of 1,600 ducks after they landed in toxic ponds due to harsh weather conditions.
(Jimmy Jeong/AP)

Alberta’s top energy spokesman now the voice of the oil industry

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It was among the most high-profile gigs in Alberta’s government staff – press secretary to the Environment Minister.

In that role, Mark Cooper was spokesman for a ministry in the spotlight as Alberta faces mounting questions about the effects of energy development, defending the province’s record in mitigating the impact of the oil sands. From there, Mr. Cooper became spokesman for Cal Dallas, Alberta’s minister of international and intergovernmental relations. It’s Mr. Dallas who travels, promoting, for instance, the province’s pipeline projects.