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Temporary foreign workers are reaching beyond targeted areas into a new range of lower-skilled, entry-level jobs.<137>March 4/07 - Seasonal workers for Vantreight Farms pick daffodils on a field in Saanichton, 15 kilometres east of Victoria early Sunday morning. Colder than normal temperatures have meant the flowers have yet to start blooming in the fields which is good news for the growers who want the flowers to arrive in stores before they bloom. Vantreight Farms is the 2nd largest producer of daffodils in North America and has an annual production of 21,000,000 stems. Don Denton photo<252><137>
Temporary foreign workers are reaching beyond targeted areas into a new range of lower-skilled, entry-level jobs.<137>March 4/07 - Seasonal workers for Vantreight Farms pick daffodils on a field in Saanichton, 15 kilometres east of Victoria early Sunday morning. Colder than normal temperatures have meant the flowers have yet to start blooming in the fields which is good news for the growers who want the flowers to arrive in stores before they bloom. Vantreight Farms is the 2nd largest producer of daffodils in North America and has an annual production of 21,000,000 stems. Don Denton photo<252><137>
(DON DENTON for The Globe and Mail)

U.S. foreign worker debate sounds all too familiar to Canadians

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Canada is hardly the only country with a controversial temporary foreign worker program. Just about everywhere they exist, such programs are a political hot potato. Employers love them, unions hate them and policymakers are left to split the difference.