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Dozens of tanker cars similar to the model used for the train that crashed in Lac-Megantic, Que., are parked on Monday, July 16, on the train's line near Farnham, Que.
Dozens of tanker cars similar to the model used for the train that crashed in Lac-Megantic, Que., are parked on Monday, July 16, on the train's line near Farnham, Que.
(Les Perreaux/The Globe and Mail)

The regulatory hurdles the oil tankers overcame before the Lac-Mégantic crash

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The crude oil that exploded in Lac-Mégantic earlier this year was classified in at least four different ways by suppliers who drew it from wells in North Dakota, the Transportation Safety Board revealed Wednesday, raising questions about U.S. and Canadian enforcement of longstanding transportation rules.