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Protesters take part in a mass sit-in in front of the British Columbia legislature in Victoria, B.C. Monday, Oct. 22, 2012. to protest the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline. Native leaders say the report could perhaps set the stage for groundbreaking talks between First Nations and government over several multibillion-dollar energy developments that have been proposed in B.C.
Protesters take part in a mass sit-in in front of the British Columbia legislature in Victoria, B.C. Monday, Oct. 22, 2012. to protest the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline. Native leaders say the report could perhaps set the stage for groundbreaking talks between First Nations and government over several multibillion-dollar energy developments that have been proposed in B.C.
(JONATHAN HAYWARD/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Harper has a lot to lose in B.C.’s pipeline politics

Pipeline politics are never far below the surface for the Harper government, and this week’s report from the panel reviewing the highly controversial Northern Gateway project will again illustrate the challenges for the Conservative government in meeting its goal of providing the Alberta-based industry with an outlet to Asia through British Columbia.