The Globe and Mail

Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

A giant piece of pipeline is placed in front of the Vancouver Art Gallery in downtown Vancouver, Tuesday, August 31, 2010. The pipeline was brought there by opponents of the Northern Gateway Pipeline Project which would see a gas pipeline built in northern B.C. Following months of hearings, years of debate and dozens of protests, the federal panel reviewing the controversial Northern Gateway pipeline will release its report later Thursday. Much hangs in the balance.
A giant piece of pipeline is placed in front of the Vancouver Art Gallery in downtown Vancouver, Tuesday, August 31, 2010. The pipeline was brought there by opponents of the Northern Gateway Pipeline Project which would see a gas pipeline built in northern B.C. Following months of hearings, years of debate and dozens of protests, the federal panel reviewing the controversial Northern Gateway pipeline will release its report later Thursday. Much hangs in the balance.
(Jonathan Hayward/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

What sets Northern Gateway apart from other pipeline politics

Politics Insider delivers premium analysis and access to Canada’s policymakers and politicians. Visit the Politics Insider homepage for insight available only to subscribers.

An oil pipeline to the west coast is now a more concrete prospect, and the politics around it will change.

Pipeline politics are now a central issue in Canada, but the Northern Gateway is unique: it means oil super-tankers plying pristine waters. Now the political debate about Gateway is likely to become less about the pipeline itself and more about those tankers.