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Quebec Minister for Social Services and Youth Protection Veronique Hivon explains a legislation on the right to die in dignity at a news conference, Wednesday, June 12, 2013 at the legislature in Quebec City.
Quebec Minister for Social Services and Youth Protection Veronique Hivon explains a legislation on the right to die in dignity at a news conference, Wednesday, June 12, 2013 at the legislature in Quebec City.
(Jacques Boissinot/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Right-to-die bill doesn’t deserve to die on the order paper

Imagine, if you will, right-do-die legislation dying on the order paper.

The irony is palpable.

That is a very real possibility in Quebec’s National Assembly today.

So how did it come to this?

The legislation, Bill 52, an Act respecting end of life care, has been debated for more than four years.

There have been two exhaustive reports by committees of experts. There have been two rounds of public hearings. The bill has gone through its requisite readings and debate. It also has all-party support – something almost unheard of in Quebec’s world of polarized politics. All that remains is the final reading, and a vote.