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A soldier salutes Veterans at the conclusion of a remembrance day ceremony at the cenotaph in the All Sappers' Memorial Park in Chilliwack November 11, 2013.
A soldier salutes Veterans at the conclusion of a remembrance day ceremony at the cenotaph in the All Sappers' Memorial Park in Chilliwack November 11, 2013.
(John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail)

Tories’ citizenship fast-track for soldiers would help few, figures show

It was a popular proposal last year that got rolled into the government’s sprawling Citizenship Act changes – a passport fast-track for those in the military.

But federal figures show the provision will apply to very few people, and that current rules in some ways block the Conservative proposal.

The notion of a military fast-track to citizenship was first raised in a private member’s bill tabled by Calgary MP Devinder Shory, and later championed by Jason Kenney – then the immigration minister – before the bill died on the order paper last summer. This year, Mr. Kenney’s successor, Citizenship and Immigration Minister Chris Alexander, revived the suggestion by rolling it into the new, wide-ranging Bill C-24, which the government says is the most substantial overhaul of citizenship rules in a generation.