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In this Jan. 28, 2014 file photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin addresses the media at the end of an EU-Russia summit, at the European Council building in Brussels.
In this Jan. 28, 2014 file photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin addresses the media at the end of an EU-Russia summit, at the European Council building in Brussels.
(Yves Logghe/AP Photo)

Shawn McCarthy

Who really gets hurt by Canada’s sanctions against Russia

Stephen Harper is warning sanctions against Russia could cause some pain but he also knows that it is Europe, not Canada, that stands to bear the brunt of a tit-for-tat escalation.

And what he doesn’t say is that Canada stands to benefit if Europe lessens its dependence on Russian oil and gas.

At this point, the sanctions announced as a result of Moscow’s annexation of Crimea are mostly symbolic, aimed at prominent Russian citizens whose fortunes are well assured. Vladimir Putin’s response has been to deny entry into his country of some MPs and prominent Ukrainian Canadians.