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Supreme Court of Canada nominee Justice Marc Nadon waits to testify before an all-party committee to review his nomination on Parliament Hill in Ottawa in this October 2, 2013 file photo. The Supreme Court will rule March 21, 2014 on whether Nadon, Prime Minister Stephen Harper's latest appointee to that court, has the legal qualifications for the job.
Supreme Court of Canada nominee Justice Marc Nadon waits to testify before an all-party committee to review his nomination on Parliament Hill in Ottawa in this October 2, 2013 file photo. The Supreme Court will rule March 21, 2014 on whether Nadon, Prime Minister Stephen Harper's latest appointee to that court, has the legal qualifications for the job.
(CHRIS WATTIE/REUTERS)

Harper’s Supreme Court fumble damages a long-standing conservative cause

Prime Minister Stephen Harper has damaged one of the long-standing causes of Canadian conservatism: reducing the prime minister’s royal power over appointments to the Supreme Court.

By rigging the multi-party process for the abortive appointment of Marc Nadon, Mr. Harper has jeopardized parliamentary vetting for the high court.