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Since the report of the Royal Commission on Health Services in 1964, Canada has had more than 40 high-level reports on improving its health-care system from task forces, commissions of inquiry, expert panels, standing committees, working groups, think tanks and policy groups.
Since the report of the Royal Commission on Health Services in 1964, Canada has had more than 40 high-level reports on improving its health-care system from task forces, commissions of inquiry, expert panels, standing committees, working groups, think tanks and policy groups.
(KEVIN VAN PAASSEN/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)

What Canadian health care lacks is action, not innovation

Earlier this week, Health Minister Rona Ambrose named a new advisory panel on health-care innovation.

It’s not a half-bad idea to tap into the ideas of a bunch of smart people – and the panel members are a stellar bunch – to “foster the kinds of innovation that improve the quality and effectiveness of our health-care system” (the minister’s words).