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Some sex workers say a police initiative to raid prostitutes’ homes to find victims of sex trafficking is simply an intimidation tactic meant to harass members of their profession in the absence of the ability to lay charges.
Some sex workers say a police initiative to raid prostitutes’ homes to find victims of sex trafficking is simply an intimidation tactic meant to harass members of their profession in the absence of the ability to lay charges.
(JOHN LEHMANN/THE GLOBE AND MAIL)

If sex workers are the victims, the government doesn’t seem interested in doing much to help them

“Could you let me speak for a second?” sex worker Amy Lebovitch said to Conservative MP Bob Dechert. “Are you asking a question or giving a speech?”

Her question during a session of the justice committee Thursday underlined a disconnect in this week’s parliamentary hearings on the Conservatives government’s new law on prostitution. The government has underpinned the whole bill with the assertion that sex workers are victims, and need to be protected from exploitation. But the Conservative MPs on the committee have often seemed less interested in hearing from them than making points from their testimony.