The Globe and Mail

Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Duane Smith, recently elected to his fourth term as president of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, addresses delegates at the council's meeting in Inuvik, N.W.T., on Monday, July 21, 2014.
Duane Smith, recently elected to his fourth term as president of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, addresses delegates at the council's meeting in Inuvik, N.W.T., on Monday, July 21, 2014.
(Zoe Ho/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

How Inuit are working with Canada, Russia and other Arctic countries

Duane Smith has witnessed a significant shift in the relationship between the indigenous people of the Arctic and the governments of northern countries over the dozen years he has been President of the Inuit Circumpolar Council.

“There’s much more understanding by the Arctic states, and hopefully by other states that are interested in becoming more active in the circumpolar Arctic, about who the Inuit are, what role we play, what rights we have,” says Mr. Smith. He was acclaimed to a fourth term this week at the annual general meeting in Inuvik of the council that represents roughly 150,000 Inuit who live in the United States, Canada, Greenland and Russia.