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The sun rises beyond the construction site of the 1.6 million square foot New Oakville Hospital in Oakville, Ontario on April 17, 2013.
The sun rises beyond the construction site of the 1.6 million square foot New Oakville Hospital in Oakville, Ontario on April 17, 2013.
(Peter Power/The Globe and Mail)

SEAN SILCOFF

If skilled tradespeople are scarce, why aren’t they paid more?

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Politicians insist that Canada has a skills shortage. The Conservative government’s latest budget highlights the issue, and Immigration Minister Jason Kenney has been out selling its solutions to what he calls the “bizarre paradox of Canadians without jobs and jobs without workers.” The government has evidently grown frustrated with years of investments in apprenticeship schemes that haven’t paid off, as Mr. Kenney told the Calgary Herald editorial board recently that “Canadian employers have not been investing enough in apprenticeships.” Perhaps it’s the government’s attempts to diagnose the problem that have fallen short.