The Globe and Mail

Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

Rescue workers attempt to rescue garment workers from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, in Savar, 30 km (19 miles) outside Dhaka April 29, 2013. Rescue officials in Bangladesh said on Monday they were unlikely to find more survivors in the rubble of a factory building that collapsed last week burying hundreds of garment workers in the country's worst industrial accident.
Rescue workers attempt to rescue garment workers from the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza building, in Savar, 30 km (19 miles) outside Dhaka April 29, 2013. Rescue officials in Bangladesh said on Monday they were unlikely to find more survivors in the rubble of a factory building that collapsed last week burying hundreds of garment workers in the country's worst industrial accident.
(Andrew Biraj/Reuters)

CARL MORTISHED

Reforming EU’s ‘trade not aid’ policies toward Bangladesh

ROB Insight is a premium commentary product offering rapid analysis of business and economic news, corporate strategy and policy, published throughout the business day. Visit the ROB Insight homepage for analysis available only to subscribers.

Hope has all but extinguished for the rescue of victims still buried under the rubble of the collapsed Dhaka sweatshop. In Bangladesh, attention has turned to the pursuit of those responsible, but in Europe and North America, the disaster is already becoming a pawn in the global politics of trade and aid.