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Construction workers prepare for a groundbreaking ceremony for an American-owned diamond-polishing factory in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, March 15, 2013. Foreign companies are flocking to Cambodia as a way to limit their overwhelming reliance on factories in China.
Construction workers prepare for a groundbreaking ceremony for an American-owned diamond-polishing factory in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, March 15, 2013. Foreign companies are flocking to Cambodia as a way to limit their overwhelming reliance on factories in China.
(Thomas Cristofoletti/New York Times)

CARL MORTISHED

Developing nations take bigger slice of investment pie

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They won’t like it but the capital market is working efficiently, more or less. In what was another year of sluggish economic recovery (or continuing despond for the wealthy world), money poured into poor countries. Statistics from the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), a UN agency that mainly complains about how the poor get left out, show that for the first time ever, developing countries are taking more of the global investment pie.