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File photo of visitors looking at aircraft models at the EADS booth during the ILA Berlin Air Show in Selchow near Schoenefeld south of Berlin, September 13, 2012. Europe's EADS confirmed July 31, 2013, plans to reorganize into three divisions and adopt the name of its planemaker unit Airbus in a bid to unite its businesses and boost shareholder returns. EADS will be called Airbus Group and will combine defence and space activities in one division that will also contain the Airbus Military business currently twinned with passenger jets.
File photo of visitors looking at aircraft models at the EADS booth during the ILA Berlin Air Show in Selchow near Schoenefeld south of Berlin, September 13, 2012. Europe's EADS confirmed July 31, 2013, plans to reorganize into three divisions and adopt the name of its planemaker unit Airbus in a bid to unite its businesses and boost shareholder returns. EADS will be called Airbus Group and will combine defence and space activities in one division that will also contain the Airbus Military business currently twinned with passenger jets.
(Tobias Schwarz/Reuters)

FINANCIAL TIMES

Farewell EADS, hello Airbus

Lex is a premium daily commentary service from the Financial Times. It helps readers make better investment decisions by highlighting key emerging risks and opportunities.

Bye bye, BAEADS. If Tom Enders, chief executive of EADS NV, buys BAE Systems PLC one day, at least it will not create another clunky acronym. EADS’s decision to rename itself Airbus – announced on Wednesday alongside first-half figures – gives a great company a proper name at last. It also bows to reality. Airbus accounts for 70 per cent of EADS’s revenue and earnings. EADS might look a bit one-legged compared with Boeing, but it is a very shapely leg.