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Game enthusiasts queue up to buy the latest instalment in the Grand Theft Auto series in Encinitas, Calif., on Sept. 17, 2013.
Game enthusiasts queue up to buy the latest instalment in the Grand Theft Auto series in Encinitas, Calif., on Sept. 17, 2013.
(MIKE BLAKE/REUTERS)

DAVE MORRIS

Video games much more fun on a screen than in a portfolio

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In the wake of the launch of Grand Theft Auto V on Tuesday, an estimated 6.5 million video-game lovers will be spending the foreseeable future staring intently at blinking, coloured lights on a screen. Older investors may scoff – though that’s a bit rich, considering the similarities between the two pursuits – but there’s clearly gold in them thar consoles. Still, figuring out which gaming-related stocks are the winners is more fraught than just watching the sales charts.