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The MV Maersk Mc-Kinney Moller, the world's biggest container ship, arrives at the harbour of Rotterdam August 16, 2013. The 55,000 tonne ship, named after the son of the founder of the oil and shipping group A.P. Moller-Maersk, has a length of 400 meters and cost $185 million.
The MV Maersk Mc-Kinney Moller, the world's biggest container ship, arrives at the harbour of Rotterdam August 16, 2013. The 55,000 tonne ship, named after the son of the founder of the oil and shipping group A.P. Moller-Maersk, has a length of 400 meters and cost $185 million.
(Michael Kooren/Reuters)

CARL MORTISHED

Despite growth in shipping, Maersk faces choppy waters

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The world’s largest container shipping company says the tide has turned. Maersk AS is expecting solid growth next year in the volume of boxes its ships around the world. There are other promising signals as well, including a surge in port traffic in China and a pick-up in rates for bulk carriers, the ships that carry raw materials around the world. The trade runes look positive, but it’s not enough reason for shipowners to celebrate. They still navigate in one of the most dysfunctional markets on the planet.