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B.C. Premier Christy Clark, right, and Alberta Premier Alison Redford take a stroll prior to a meeting in Kelowna, B.C., in June. Ms. Clark insists B.C. must get its ‘fare share’ of economic benefits if it is to shoulder the environmental risk of energy infrastructure.
B.C. Premier Christy Clark, right, and Alberta Premier Alison Redford take a stroll prior to a meeting in Kelowna, B.C., in June. Ms. Clark insists B.C. must get its ‘fare share’ of economic benefits if it is to shoulder the environmental risk of energy infrastructure.
(JONATHAN HAYWARD/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

B.C. ready to deal amid shifting global energy market

The energy sector is seeing the softer side of Christy Clark. Or maybe it’s just the side that realizes that money, like flies, is more attracted to honey than vinegar.

In the months leading up to her re-election last spring, the British Columbia Premier took a relatively hard line on a range of proposals to tap B.C.’s enormous potential as a conduit for getting oil and natural gas to Asian markets – from pipelines to refineries to liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants. Her tough stance helped paint her as a defender of the province’s principled interests when it comes to natural resources, environmental protection and native concerns (albeit less extreme than her prime challenger on the left, erstwhile NDP leader Adrian Dix).