The Globe and Mail

Go to the Globe and Mail homepage

Jump to main navigationJump to main content

An environmental safety monitor carries out contamination checks at EDF Energy’s Hinkley Point B nuclear power station in Bridgwater, southwest England. EDF and Britain have agreed a deal for the construction of the Hinkley Point C plant.
An environmental safety monitor carries out contamination checks at EDF Energy’s Hinkley Point B nuclear power station in Bridgwater, southwest England. EDF and Britain have agreed a deal for the construction of the Hinkley Point C plant.
(SUZANNE PLUNKETT/REUTERS)

U.K. consumers to pay the price for energy stability

It’s been more than half a century since the world’s first civil nuclear power station, Calder Hall, was built in the northwest of England and once again, Britain is relying on public funding to launch a £16-billion ($26.6-billion) nuclear power project. This time, however, the backer is not the British state – EDF, the French state-controlled power company has stepped into the breach with two Chinese state-owned power companies. China General Nuclear Power Group and China National Nuclear Corp are together taking a third of the financial risk.