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Lora Lindsey talks to a New York University recruiter at a career fair in New York, Dec. 4, 2013. After years of frustrating fits and starts in the wake of the financial crisis and the Great Recession, the economy finally appears to be generating jobs at a healthier, more sustainable pace that many analysts now think will continue into 2014.
Lora Lindsey talks to a New York University recruiter at a career fair in New York, Dec. 4, 2013. After years of frustrating fits and starts in the wake of the financial crisis and the Great Recession, the economy finally appears to be generating jobs at a healthier, more sustainable pace that many analysts now think will continue into 2014.
(Marilynn K. Yee/NYT)

Ending benefits could cut U.S. jobless rate – for the wrong reasons

As of December 28, 1.3 million out-of-work Americans will no longer receive emergency federal unemployment benefits. Economists fear the program’s expiry could impact growth, and that this latest dose of austerity will actually spark a dip in the national unemployment rate – but for all the wrong reasons.