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Protesters calling for higher wages for fast-food workers stand outside a McDonald's restaurant in Oakland, California December 5, 2013. The group, which numbered about 200, shut down the store for more than half an hour as part of a daylong nationwide strike demanding a $15 dollar minimum wage.
Protesters calling for higher wages for fast-food workers stand outside a McDonald's restaurant in Oakland, California December 5, 2013. The group, which numbered about 200, shut down the store for more than half an hour as part of a daylong nationwide strike demanding a $15 dollar minimum wage.
(Noah Berger/Reuters)

Minimum wage debate ignores key issue: Poverty

In many ways, the past few years have been defined by a single issue – inequality – and low-wage workers have been its public face. Thousands of fast-food workers gathered from Atlanta to Seattle last September to demand better wages. Protests flared up in Sao Paolo, Hong Kong, Rome, and Chengdu over inequality and wages. Wal-Mart employees recently held a Thanksgiving food drive for other Wal-Mart employees, illuminating the hardship faced by retail workers in America.