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Robots do a quality control check of a 2014 Ford F-150 pick-up truck as it moves down the assembly line at the Ford Motor Dearborn Truck Plant in Dearborn, Michigan in this September 16, 2013 file photo.
Robots do a quality control check of a 2014 Ford F-150 pick-up truck as it moves down the assembly line at the Ford Motor Dearborn Truck Plant in Dearborn, Michigan in this September 16, 2013 file photo.
(REBECCA COOK/REUTERS)

White-collar workers have most to fear from technology

Conventional wisdom says that it’s only a matter of time until a robot takes all of our jobs. But if this is the case, why are the world’s largest robotics manufacturers struggling for sales and profit growth?

Switzerland-based industrial giant ABB Ltd, one of the largest manufacturers of automation systems, announced a major shortfall in profit expectations Tuesday and the stock immediately dropped more than 4 per cent. To be fair, the reduced earnings guidance was not the result of the robotics divisions, it was related to the electrical power division.