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Oil derricks are seen near the Cromer Terminal, in southwestern Manitoba. Cromer, which is a hamlet of approximately 25 people, is one of the distribution hubs of the Bakken oil deposit straddling Manitoba, Saskatchewan and North Dakota.
Oil derricks are seen near the Cromer Terminal, in southwestern Manitoba. Cromer, which is a hamlet of approximately 25 people, is one of the distribution hubs of the Bakken oil deposit straddling Manitoba, Saskatchewan and North Dakota.
(Colin Corneau For The Globe and Mail)

energy

Can the Bakken fuel America? Don’t bet on it

Much of the talk about U.S. oil production for the last couple of years points to a remarkable conclusion: The country is on the road to energy self-sufficiency.

There is good reason for this. Oil output from shale formations such as the North Dakota Bakken and Eagle Ford in Texas has gone great guns and is on track to keep setting records. Together, the pair of crude-oil plays are now pushing two million barrels per day, representing nearly 60 per cent of Canada’s overall output.