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The Canada Revenue Agency website is seen on a computer screen displaying information about an internet security vulnerability called the "Heartbleed Bug" in Toronto, April 9, 2014. Right in the heart of tax-filing season, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) shut down access to online tax services on April 9, 2014 because of an Internet bug that has made data on many of the world's major websites vulnerable to theft by hackers.
The Canada Revenue Agency website is seen on a computer screen displaying information about an internet security vulnerability called the "Heartbleed Bug" in Toronto, April 9, 2014. Right in the heart of tax-filing season, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) shut down access to online tax services on April 9, 2014 because of an Internet bug that has made data on many of the world's major websites vulnerable to theft by hackers.
(Mark Blinch/Reuters)

Heartbleed exposes cheapskate cybersecurity budgets

It’s called the Heartbleed bug and it’s as awful as it sounds – at least when it comes to the enormous risks posed to supposedly safe and encrypted data.

The problem is so serious that it prompted the Canada Revenue Agency to temporarily shut down online services for taxpayers at the height of tax-filing season to ensure “the private information of Canadians remains safe and secure.”