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In this July 25, 2012, file photo, then-Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington.
In this July 25, 2012, file photo, then-Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington.
(J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

Geithner no fan of Canada’s stress-test secrecy

Timothy Geithner, who fought the financial crisis from start to finish as New York Fed president and U.S. treasury secretary, played a leading role in arresting one of history’s greatest financial calamities. Yet his legacy suffers from a lack of tangible accomplishments to put on his mantel.

Unlike, say, the late Jim Flaherty, who resigned as Canada’s finance minister confident that he had erased the deficit he created while spending his way out of the Great Recession, Mr. Geithner walked away in January 2013 with the U.S. economy still in a bit of a mess. The overhaul of financial regulation that he initiated remains unfinished, and he failed to persuade Congress to lower corporate taxes, despite years of trying.