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Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) joins lawmakers and solar industry executives, including from SolarWorld, to announce a broad trade case against Chinese solar companies, in Washington, Oct. 19, 2011. The solar manufacturer is among groups that have suffered data thefts after publicly pushing back against China's trade policies.
Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) joins lawmakers and solar industry executives, including from SolarWorld, to announce a broad trade case against Chinese solar companies, in Washington, Oct. 19, 2011. The solar manufacturer is among groups that have suffered data thefts after publicly pushing back against China's trade policies.
(Philip Scott Andrews/NYT)

Did the long arm of U.S. law overreach on hacking?

The arm of the U.S. law is long, but it doesn’t reach everywhere. Authorities extracted a guilty plea from Credit Suisse on May 19 for helping Americans avoid taxes. The same day, it also charged five Chinese military officers with hacking. The Swiss bank expressed remorse and coughed up a $2.5-billion (U.S.) fine; China responded with defiance.