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Banknotes from different countries at the main office of the Korea Exchange Bank are seen in this picture illustration taken in Seoul on October 22, 2010.
Banknotes from different countries at the main office of the Korea Exchange Bank are seen in this picture illustration taken in Seoul on October 22, 2010.
(TRUTH LEEM/REUTERS)

Little attention is being given to G20 economic pledge

Tired of lacklustre economic growth, the finance ministers of the Group of 20 nations earlier this year tried to recapture some of the old magic of their epic struggle against the Great Recession.

In an echo of the co-ordinated fiscal stimulus the G20 deployed to avoid a global depression, the members of the 2014 roster said they would implement new policies that would raise the current trajectory of the group’s combined gross domestic product by 2 per cent over five years. They said they would review progress in September, when ministers and central bankers are scheduled to meet in Cairns, Australia. The International Monetary Fund and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development were charged with delivering the report card.