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Afghan migrant Abdullah Shah sits in his hut in the ‘jungle,’ a squalid makeshift camp on the fringes of Calais, France, where hopeful economic migrants wait for a chance to clamber aboard a truck headed for the Channel Tunnel and Britain.
Afghan migrant Abdullah Shah sits in his hut in the ‘jungle,’ a squalid makeshift camp on the fringes of Calais, France, where hopeful economic migrants wait for a chance to clamber aboard a truck headed for the Channel Tunnel and Britain.
(Geert vanden Wijngaert For The Globe and Mail)

EU’s deluge of migrants a badge of economic success

Hunkered down and hidden in bushes beside a ramp leading off a highway in northern France, four young Africans watch a stream of trucks heading for the Channel Tunnel and Britain. If the vehicles slow to a crawl, the men will try to jump on board, grabbing on to the cages holding spare wheels, or they may even get into the driver’s cab using threats of violence or the promise of bribes. Calais, a bleak, windswept and impoverished Channel port, has become a magnet for desperate young men from as far afield as Eritrea, Sudan, Syria and Somalia. It is the choke point, the final hurdle on a terrible journey to Britain: the promised land of jobs, free health care, benefits and a future.