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Cattle graze in front of British Nuclear Electric's Wylfa Magnox plant in Anglesey, Wales in a September 13, 1995 file photo. Japanese energy and engineering company Hitachi h as bought Britain's Horizon nuclear project to build four to six new nuclear power stations, the department of energy and climate change (DECC) said on October 30, 2012. "Hitachi this morning confirmed that it intends to progress with Horizon Nuclear Power's plans to build between two and three new nuclear plants at Wylfa on Anglesey and the same at Oldbury in Gloucestershire," DECC said in a statement.
Cattle graze in front of British Nuclear Electric's Wylfa Magnox plant in Anglesey, Wales in a September 13, 1995 file photo. Japanese energy and engineering company Hitachi h as bought Britain's Horizon nuclear project to build four to six new nuclear power stations, the department of energy and climate change (DECC) said on October 30, 2012. "Hitachi this morning confirmed that it intends to progress with Horizon Nuclear Power's plans to build between two and three new nuclear plants at Wylfa on Anglesey and the same at Oldbury in Gloucestershire," DECC said in a statement.
(Bob Collier/Reuters)

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Hitachi and SNC-Lavalin pursue the nuclear option

The Germans have quit, the Chinese said no thank you and the French are quibbling over the price, but a Japanese and Canadian consortium said they will do it, come what may. Hitachi and SNC-Lavalin are taking over Horizon, a project to build two nuclear power stations in Britain. The Japanese company, which is in joint venture with the Montreal engineering contractor, said today it would pay £700-million ($1.125-billion) to EON and RWE, the German utilities which set up Horizon three years ago. If you believe the promises, Hitachi and SNC-Lavalin will build two nukes, one in Anglesey in Wales and another in Gloucestershire.