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Carson Block, founder of short-selling research firm Muddy Waters, speaks during an interview with Reuters in Washington April 2, 2012. Block, 35, is perhaps the best known member of a group of short-selling investors and financial bloggers who exposed fraudulent accounting practices among China-based companies with U.S. or Canadian stock listings. Toronto-listed Chinese forestry company Sino-Forest Corp filed for bankruptcy protection months after Muddy Waters accused the company of exaggerating its assets, and is now seeking $4 billion in damages from Block, his firm and other unnamed parties.
Carson Block, founder of short-selling research firm Muddy Waters, speaks during an interview with Reuters in Washington April 2, 2012. Block, 35, is perhaps the best known member of a group of short-selling investors and financial bloggers who exposed fraudulent accounting practices among China-based companies with U.S. or Canadian stock listings. Toronto-listed Chinese forestry company Sino-Forest Corp filed for bankruptcy protection months after Muddy Waters accused the company of exaggerating its assets, and is now seeking $4 billion in damages from Block, his firm and other unnamed parties.
(Benjamin Myers/Reuters)

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In Singapore, Muddy Waters takes on bigger fish

Carson Block is going after bigger game. The short-selling investor has established a track record in recent years exposing fraud at Chinese companies through his research firm, Muddy Waters. So his decision to raise doubts about commodity trader Olam’s accounts will make investors sit up. But the Singapore-based company is a much larger target. Both sides have much to lose.