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Mobilicity chairman John Bitove. The wireless upstart has scoured the globe to find a buyer, contacting ‘more than 30’ potential purchasers, according to court documents filed as part of the company’s restructuring. But the Vaughan, Ont.-based carrier has yet to clinch a binding sale agreement. And time is running out for it to do so.
Mobilicity chairman John Bitove. The wireless upstart has scoured the globe to find a buyer, contacting ‘more than 30’ potential purchasers, according to court documents filed as part of the company’s restructuring. But the Vaughan, Ont.-based carrier has yet to clinch a binding sale agreement. And time is running out for it to do so.
(Peter Power/The Globe and Mail)

Ottawa’s Mobilicity decision suggests somebody pitched a rescue plan

The federal government’s decision to deny Telus Corp.’s request for an exemption from wireless rules so it could buy the struggling new entrant known as Mobilicity has rekindled speculation that somebody has a plan to create a big fourth cell phone competitor.

The thinking goes that one of two things must have happened. Either Ottawa decided that it just simply could not bend the rules and look like it was going backward on wireless competition, even if it meant Mobilicity would be doomed, or someone convinced Ottawa that there is another way to do this that keeps Mobilicity alive in some form.