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Naomi Wanjiku, right, works with a customer at a M-Pesa booth, a Kenyan cellphone-based money transfer service that is changing the face of banking in East Africa, in Nairobi, Kenya, March 26, 2014. Using smartphones to make payments for transit, food, clothing or even to pay bills is commonplace overseas but not in the U.S., where such a system would be extremely expensive.
Naomi Wanjiku, right, works with a customer at a M-Pesa booth, a Kenyan cellphone-based money transfer service that is changing the face of banking in East Africa, in Nairobi, Kenya, March 26, 2014. Using smartphones to make payments for transit, food, clothing or even to pay bills is commonplace overseas but not in the U.S., where such a system would be extremely expensive.
(Sven Torfinn/NYT)

Why Bay Street should back financial inclusion

Generally speaking, reporters should steer clear of policy advice. We know less than half of what we think we know, and we’re undereducated and inexperienced compared with the people we write about.

That said, allow me to suggest a way Ottawa and Bay Street could make a difference in the world. For those of you on Bay, there even may be a little profit in it.