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Burger King managed to get its U.S. tax rate down to 27.5 per cent while it paid 26.8 per cent in Canada, so tax savings aren’t the best reason to relocate to Canada after a Tim Hortons takeover.
Burger King managed to get its U.S. tax rate down to 27.5 per cent while it paid 26.8 per cent in Canada, so tax savings aren’t the best reason to relocate to Canada after a Tim Hortons takeover.
(Daniel Acker/Bloomberg)

mergers and acquisitions

Low taxes just icing on the Timbit

Last August, the Canadian National Exhibition in Toronto brought us the cronut burger, a croissant-doughnut-burger hybrid that left fair-goers with a upset stomachs. This year, there’s an even bigger burger doughnut combo and its effects are equally as uncertain – that is, if the proposed takeover of Tim Hortons Inc. by Burger King Worldwide Inc. proves to be of net benefit to Canada under the Investment Canada Act.