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Japan may serve as an example of what’s to come for countries facing widening recessions. A man looks at an electronic board displaying market indices and graphs outside a brokerage in Tokyo September 20, 2012. The Nikkei average shed 1.6 percent on Thursday, giving up the previous session's sharp gain, as lackluster Chinese manufacturing data reinforced concerns over flagging demand in Japan's largest trading partner. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
Japan may serve as an example of what’s to come for countries facing widening recessions. A man looks at an electronic board displaying market indices and graphs outside a brokerage in Tokyo September 20, 2012. The Nikkei average shed 1.6 percent on Thursday, giving up the previous session's sharp gain, as lackluster Chinese manufacturing data reinforced concerns over flagging demand in Japan's largest trading partner. REUTERS/Yuriko Nakao (JAPAN - Tags: BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
(YURIKO NAKAO/REUTERS)

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IPOs get off to roaring start

Talk of a “great rotation” into stocks, a sense of optimism that the path of economic growth doesn’t contain any nasty surprises and pent-up demand from investors – put those things together and you have the ingredients for a speedy start to the year for initial public offerings and stock sales.

So far, there have been IPOs worth $10.6-billion (U.S.) in 2013, more than three times the level of activity in the same stretch of 2012, according to figures from Thomson Reuters. Big debuts include Nippon Prologis REIT in Japan, German REIT LEG Immobilien AG and Zoetis Inc. in the United States.