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Jack Mintz, of the School of Public Policy at the University of Calgary, speaks to reporters on Sept. 24, 2013. Mintz has co-authored a report saying a 13-per-cent HST could end up being revenue neutral for the province and make Alberta a more attractive place for business and investment.
Jack Mintz, of the School of Public Policy at the University of Calgary, speaks to reporters on Sept. 24, 2013. Mintz has co-authored a report saying a 13-per-cent HST could end up being revenue neutral for the province and make Alberta a more attractive place for business and investment.
(Bill Graveland/The Canadian Press)

Rod Love

Why Western Canadians say no to sales tax: That horse has died

On July 1 this year, we were in London and went to the Canada Day celebrations at the Canadian High Commission in Trafalgar Square. Charlene and I figured we might as well have some of my taxpayer-funded food and wine (and lots of it) while we were in the neighbourhood.

Former British Columbia Premier and now Canadian High Commissioner Gordon Campbell was our host, and we chatted about the good old days when he and Ralph Klein were mayors together, and then premiers together.