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A woman walks through an area only meters from her village of Nimba Point in Liberia, that was once forest and farmland only a few months ago. Residents are now forced with adjusting to an agriculture based economy to a wage economy , although contracts concerning compensation are still being disputed.
A woman walks through an area only meters from her village of Nimba Point in Liberia, that was once forest and farmland only a few months ago. Residents are now forced with adjusting to an agriculture based economy to a wage economy , although contracts concerning compensation are still being disputed.
(Peter Power/The Globe and Mail)

Africa Next

Land rush leaves Liberia’s farmers in the dust


In this fifth of a six-part series, Globe and Mail Africa correspondent Geoffrey York investigates how Africa's growth is changing its future.

As he walks through the denuded remains of his farm, Kandakai Blasuah points to the marshland where he used to fish. It’s now dry, filled with sand.

The bush where he gathered medicinal herbs is also gone. His farm, too, has vanished. All that’s left are a few rows of corn, and a new road to serve the vast palm plantation that has enveloped his village for the past two years.