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Protesters with a poster of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi during a rally in the Nasr City neighborhood of Cairo, July 4, 2013. Egypt’s new acting head of state, Adly Mansour, sought reconciliation on Thursday with the Muslim Brotherhood supporters of Morsi, the deposed leader, even as an alliance of Islamists made plans to hold protests.
Protesters with a poster of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi during a rally in the Nasr City neighborhood of Cairo, July 4, 2013. Egypt’s new acting head of state, Adly Mansour, sought reconciliation on Thursday with the Muslim Brotherhood supporters of Morsi, the deposed leader, even as an alliance of Islamists made plans to hold protests.
(TARA TODRAS-WHITEHILL/NYT)

Patrick Martin

To see how Morsi lost Egypt, get away from Tahrir Square

To find the answer to how most Egyptians really feel about their leaders, you have to get away from Tahrir Square, that iconic Cairo venue where uprisings become public displays but tend to reflect the views only of those who are motivated to strike out in front of the cameras.

Most people in this country are more reserved, and more concerned with their families’ daily means of survival. And you don't have to go far from Tahrir to find them.