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A Muslim Brotherhood supporter confronts the Egyptian army on the streets of Cairo on Monday, July 8, 2013, the day that at least 50 Brotherhood supporters were killed when soldiers opened fire against them.
A Muslim Brotherhood supporter confronts the Egyptian army on the streets of Cairo on Monday, July 8, 2013, the day that at least 50 Brotherhood supporters were killed when soldiers opened fire against them.
(Patrick Martin/The Globe and Mail)

PATRICK MARTIN

In its attempt to crush Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt ignores history

Cairo is on tenterhooks today as the Egyptian capital once again faces the prospect of deadly clashes between supporters and opponents of the Muslim Brotherhood and its imprisoned president Mohamed Morsi.

This time the threat to the 85-year-old organization seems almost existential thanks to the surprise call to arms this week by the military’s leader General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who has summoned a massive public display of opposition to the Brothers who have planned a number of marches of their own today.