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An Israeli border police officer checks a bag of a Palestinian woman as she waits to cross through an Israeli checkpoint on her way to pray at the al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan at the Qalandia checkpoint between the West Bank city of Ramallah and Jerusalem, Friday, Aug. 2, 2013.
An Israeli border police officer checks a bag of a Palestinian woman as she waits to cross through an Israeli checkpoint on her way to pray at the al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan at the Qalandia checkpoint between the West Bank city of Ramallah and Jerusalem, Friday, Aug. 2, 2013.
(Majdi Mohammed/Associated Press)

PATRICK MARTIN

Why the latest Israeli-Palestinian peace talks might just succeed

It’s been almost 20 years since Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization signed the Oslo peace agreement – the last time there was any real optimism that the conflict over Israel’s creation might be resolved.

While the world’s attention was focused on the White House lawn that day in September, 1993 – watching Yitzhak Rabin and Yasser Arafat shake hands in front of U.S. president Bill Clinton – I chose to spend the day in Gaza, watching the reaction of people with the most at stake. They were deeply divided.