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Some 15,000 pieces of pipe for TransCanada Corp.’s Keystone XL pipeline lie in a field in North Dakota on April 23, 2013.
Some 15,000 pieces of pipe for TransCanada Corp.’s Keystone XL pipeline lie in a field in North Dakota on April 23, 2013.
(The Globe and Mail/Nathan VanderKlippe)

ERIC MORSE

Keystone approval was a no-brainer – then Canada played the ‘China card’

The continuing Canada-U.S. spat over the building of the Keystone XL pipeline may be raising another bogeyman in bilateral relations: security of energy supply. When the Americans talk about security of supply, they aren’t talking about security of Canadian energy supply, except as they perceive it to affect their own security. Even when the relationship is warmer than it currently is, issues of continental security are political red flags, and in the case of energy neither leader has been pouring much oil on troubled waters.