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A convoy of UN vehicles carrying a team of United Nations chemical weapons experts and escorted by Free Syrian Army fighters (vehicle on left) drive through one of the sites of an alleged chemical weapons attack in eastern Ghouta in Damascus suburbs on August 28, 2013.
A convoy of UN vehicles carrying a team of United Nations chemical weapons experts and escorted by Free Syrian Army fighters (vehicle on left) drive through one of the sites of an alleged chemical weapons attack in eastern Ghouta in Damascus suburbs on August 28, 2013.
(REUTERS)

Colin Robertson

These are Canada’s options in Syria and Egypt. None of them are easy

What can Canada do about Syria and Egypt? The options for policymakers range from bad to worse.

Syria is the latest example of a failing state where the dictator is doing everything he can to hang onto power including breaking international law, most recently in the apparent use of chemical weapons.

Meanwhile, the military coup in Egypt that ousted President Mohamed Morsi is a reminder that the transition to representative government takes time and requires patience. And if we have learned anything from Iraq and Afghanistan it is that the road to representative government is long, crooked, tortuous and filled with disappointments.