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A UN chemical-weapons expert inspects one of the sites of an alleged chemical weapons attack in the Damascus suburb of Zamalka on Aug. 29, 2013.
A UN chemical-weapons expert inspects one of the sites of an alleged chemical weapons attack in the Damascus suburb of Zamalka on Aug. 29, 2013.
(REUTERS)

MICHAEL BELL

What’s really at stake in Syria is U.S. credibility

Britain is scheduled to submit a resolution to the United Nations Security Council that would authorize military action, under Chapter 7 of the Charter, formally aimed at protecting civilians in Syria, a euphemism for attacks on the military assets of the Assad regime. It is unlikely such a text will pass given an almost certain Russian veto. The United States and its allies are nevertheless virtually sure to act despite this seeming break with international law, as former U.S. president Bill Clinton did respecting Kosovo in 1999.